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Top 100 books on European Literature


 
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The Man Who Was Thursday : A Nightmare

By: Chesterton, Gilbert Keith, 1874-1936

It is very difficult to classify THE MAN WHO WAS THURSDAY. It is possible to say that it is a gripping adventure story of murderous criminals and brilliant policemen; but it was to be expected that the author of the Father Brown stories should tell a detective story like no-one else. On this level, therefore, THE MAN WHO WAS THURSDAY succeeds superbly; if nothing else, it is a magnificent tour-de-force of suspense-writing.

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Man Who Was Thursday, A Nightmare, The

By: G. K. Chesterton

In a surreal turn-of-the-century London, Gabriel Syme, a poet, is recruited to a secret anti-anarchist taskforce at Scotland Yard. Lucian Gregory, an anarchist poet, is the only poet in Saffron Park, until he loses his temper in an argument over the purpose of poetry with Gabriel Syme, who takes the opposite view. After some time, the frustrated Gregory finds Syme and leads him to a local anarchist meeting-place to prove that he is a true anarchist. Instead of the anarch...

Adventure, Spy stories

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The Man Who Was Thursday

By: Chesterton, Gilbert Keith, 1874-1936

This is a tale of those old fears, even of those emptied hells, and none but you shall understand the true thing that it tells?Of what colossal gods of shame could cow men and yet crash, Of what huge devils hid the stars, yet fell at a pistol flash. The doubts that were so plain to chase, so dreadful to withstand?Oh, who shall understand but you; yea, who shall understand? The doubts that drove us through the night as we two talked amain, and day had broken on the street...

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The Barber of Seville; A Comic Opera in Two Acts. The Overture and...

By: Rossini, Gioacchino, 1792-1868; Sterbini, Cesare, 1784-1831

Petrarca, Francesco, 1304-1374

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The Iliad

By: Homer; George Theodoridis, Translator

The killing fields of Troy.

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Iliad, The

By: Homer

The Iliad, together with the Odyssey, is one of two ancient Greek epic poems traditionally attributed to Homer. The poem is commonly dated to the 8th or 7th century BC, and many scholars believe it is the oldest extant work of literature in the Greek language, making it the first work of European literature. The existence of a single author for the poems is disputed as the poems themselves show evidence of a long oral tradition and hence, multiple authors. The poem conce...

War stories, Poetry, Tragedy

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The Iliad

By: Samuel Butler

Excerpt: SING, O GODDESS, the anger of Achilles son of Peleus, that brought countless ills upon the Achaeans. Many a brave soul did it send hurrying down to Hades, and many a hero did it yield a prey to dogs and vultures, for so were the counsels of Jove fulfilled from the day on which the son of Atreus, king of men, and great Achilles, first fell out with one another.

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The Odyssey

By: Homer

Excerpt: The Odyssey by Homer, translated by Samuel Butler.

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Odyssey, The

By: Homer

The Odyssey is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems (the other being the Iliad), attributed to the poet Homer. The poem is commonly dated to between 800 and 600 BC. The poem is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, and concerns the events that befall the Greek hero Odysseus in his long journey back to his native land Ithaca after the fall of Troy. It takes Odysseus ten years to return to his native land of Ithaca after ten years of war; during his 20-year absence, hi...

Adventure, Sea stories

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The Odyssey

By: Homer; George Theodoridis, Translator

The wanderings of Odysseus.

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The Republic, Score Plato Rep

By: Plato

Description: The Republic, written in 380BC by the great philosopher and thinker Plato, is the longest and greatest of his works. Originally titled as politeria, meaning 'City-State governance' in Greek, it actually proposes a Just society ruled by a phil

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Republic, The

By: Plato

The Republic is a Socratic dialogue by Plato, written in approximately 380 BC. It is one of the most influential works of philosophy and political theory, and arguably Plato's best known work. In it, Socrates and various other Athenians and foreigners discuss the meaning of justice and whether the just man is happier than the unjust man by constructing an imaginary city ruled by philosopher-kings. The dialogue also discusses the nature of the philosopher, Plato's Theory ...

Philosophy

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The Republic

By: Plato

Excerpt: The Republic by Plato.

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The Decameron

By: Giovanni Boccaccio

Gracious Ladies, so often as I consider with my selfe, and observe respectively, how naturally you are enclined to compassion; as many times doe I acknowledge, that this present worke of mine, will (in your judgement) appeare to have but a harsh and offensive beginning, in regard of the mournfull remembrance it beareth at the verie entrance of the last Pestilentiall mortality, universally hurtfull to all that beheld it, or otherwise came to knowledge of it. But for all t...

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Decameron, The

By: Giovanni Boccaccio

The Decameron (subtitle: Prencipe Galeotto) is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353. It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic. Many notable writers such as Shakespeare and Chaucer are said to have borrowed from The Decameron. (from Wikipedia)

Fiction, Literature, Short stories

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The Decameron: Or, Ten Days Entertainment

By: Giovanni Boccaccio
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Le Cid

By: Pierre Corneille; Tony Kline, Translator

His drama, Le Cid, in English verse.

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Paradise Lost

By: John Milton

Of Man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste Brought death into the World, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, Heavenly Muse, that, on the secret top Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire That shepherd who first taught the chosen seed In the beginning how the heavens and earth Rose out of Chaos: or, if Sion hill Delight thee more, and Siloa's brook that flowed Fast ...

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Paradise Lost

By: John Milton

Paradise Lost is the first epic of English literature written in the classical style. John Milton saw himself as the intellectual heir of Homer, Virgil, and Dante, and sought to create a work of art which fully represented the most basic tenets of the Protestant faith. His work, which was dictated from memory and transcribed by his daughter, remains as one of the most powerful English poems.

Religion, Poetry

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Paradise Lost

By: John Milton

Excerpt: Paradise Lost, A Poem in Twelve Books by John Milton.

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